August 13, 2012
I needed a small tent while waiting on a couple of repairs to the SL3, and spotted a Tarptent Moment going secondhand for just over £100. I’ve been in it for the last month or so and it’s proved much better than expected, handling a 12 hour Hebridean hoolie with little drama. It pitches unbelievably quickly compared to the SL3, just two pegs in its basic configuration, and is surprisingly roomy compared to most generic nylon coffins. Although it’s a single skin design, effective venting means that condensation can be kept under control most of the time.
There are design niggles: I don’t like the J-door on the inner mesh panel, and the main zip stormflap is so flimsy it can snag easily when you close the flysheet door. I’m not overly keen on the optional cross pole; using trekking poles to brace the ends seems to work just as well and is less hassle. Although the tent is plenty big enough for someone over six feet, there’s not much room for gear, so you have to be pretty organised. Getting in and out in heavy rain requires care, and it would not make a good winter tent (the flysheet hem sits too high which, coupled with the mesh liner, would end up with you getting covered in windblown snow).
But that’s dwelling on the negatives, and I did like this tent. Bought as a stopgap, I’ll be keeping it for future use. It’s nice to be back in the SL3, though - so much space!

I needed a small tent while waiting on a couple of repairs to the SL3, and spotted a Tarptent Moment going secondhand for just over £100. I’ve been in it for the last month or so and it’s proved much better than expected, handling a 12 hour Hebridean hoolie with little drama. It pitches unbelievably quickly compared to the SL3, just two pegs in its basic configuration, and is surprisingly roomy compared to most generic nylon coffins. Although it’s a single skin design, effective venting means that condensation can be kept under control most of the time.

There are design niggles: I don’t like the J-door on the inner mesh panel, and the main zip stormflap is so flimsy it can snag easily when you close the flysheet door. I’m not overly keen on the optional cross pole; using trekking poles to brace the ends seems to work just as well and is less hassle. Although the tent is plenty big enough for someone over six feet, there’s not much room for gear, so you have to be pretty organised. Getting in and out in heavy rain requires care, and it would not make a good winter tent (the flysheet hem sits too high which, coupled with the mesh liner, would end up with you getting covered in windblown snow).

But that’s dwelling on the negatives, and I did like this tent. Bought as a stopgap, I’ll be keeping it for future use. It’s nice to be back in the SL3, though - so much space!